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Budget Reply Bingo with your host Tony Abbott!!

May 10, 2012

Christopher Pyne has been wheeled out in front of the media this morning doing no less than two interviews on ABC News radio within the space of a couple of hours.

His challenge was to explain why the proposed cash handout announced by Wayne Swan in the Federal Budget was not materially different in nature from the Howard government’s baby bonus.

Whichever way you look at it, a cash hand out is a cash handout.

Meanwhile, Joe Hockey, Andrew Robb and Tony Abbott are probably bunkered down about now rehearsing glib slogans and one liners to ridicule the Labor Government’s Federal Budget.  Let’s face it, that’s pretty much all they’re good for.

A detailed critique of the Government’s figures is simply beyond them.

The Farnham Report understands that it will be Tony Abbott delivering the reply… Shouldn’t that task fall upon bumbling Joe….?

 

 

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147 Comments leave one →
  1. JAWS permalink
    May 10, 2012 11:46 am

    “Whichever way you look at it, a cash hand out is a cash handout.”

    Baby Bonus Prerequisite = Birth Certificate

    Previous School Handout = Proof of Purchase

    New School Handout = No Proof Required

    That’s the difference

  2. May 10, 2012 12:24 pm

    Would you let Schlocky Hockey loose on anything to do with finance?

    Phoney Tony’s the only real alternative, he can at least count! Hope he doesn’t have a verbal blockage with optional head nod though 😉

    Could use Malcolm, at least he’s intelligent, but that would put the cat right amongs the NO Coalition pigeons.

  3. el gordo permalink
    May 10, 2012 3:17 pm

    ‘Could use Malcolm, at least he’s intelligent,’

    It cannot be denied, but he is deluded on a particular issue. If Talcum recanted he might be given a chance at the top job.

  4. TB Queensland permalink
    May 10, 2012 3:24 pm

    The Farnham Report understands that it will be Tony Abbott delivering the reply… Shouldn’t that task fall upon bumbling Joe….?

    While technically correct … in the greater scheme of things does it really make much difference?

    Personally, I’d sooner listen/watch that straightjacket king of mumbles and laughs, Shadow Finance Minister Robb … as he forgets the script and believes the bullshit he dribbles … that’s always good for a laugh …

    … and then the side shoe shuffle by Abbott, Hockey and Co is a scream, trying to:

    a) understand what Andrew’s prattling about; and

    b) going into recovery mode …

  5. TB Queensland permalink
    May 10, 2012 3:26 pm

    If Talcum recanted he might be given a chance at the top job.

    Sneaky, egg, very sneaky …

  6. el gordo permalink
    May 10, 2012 3:31 pm

    It’s like walking on egg shells…

    Noticed that Costello has angrily denied that he wants a seat, so the punters automatically say he denies too much.

    Some wit suggested he try for Dobell.

  7. Tom of Melbourne permalink
    May 10, 2012 4:21 pm

    I think you’ll find that the leader of the opposition always gives the budget reply.

  8. TB Queensland permalink
    May 10, 2012 4:24 pm

    I think you’re right … ToMMy … we were just speculating … you know … like the Craig Thomson thread 😀

  9. May 10, 2012 7:15 pm

    anyone planning on showing up tonight?

  10. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 7:19 pm

    I was busy on budget night but I’m not missing tonight’s auspicious occasion. I suppose Jaws will go missing again?

  11. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 7:23 pm

    (I’m sick of pepper grinders breaking or wearing out, so I just went out and bought a quite expensive Peugeot model. Here’s hoping.)

  12. May 10, 2012 7:26 pm

    Good on you Tony.

    A Peugeot pepper grinder…?

    I have a bottle of Coonawarra Cab Sav at the ready…

  13. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 7:29 pm

    Yes. I’ve just tested one of tonight’s selection. Very drinkable. 😉

  14. May 10, 2012 7:30 pm

    excellent, cheers!

    Just realised I need a top up…..

  15. May 10, 2012 7:31 pm

    Chris Uhmann is such a twat.

  16. May 10, 2012 7:32 pm

    Julie Bishop looks like she’s walked off the set of Star Trek.

  17. May 10, 2012 7:34 pm

    Tony needs to learn that the word “year” only has one syllable not two…

    It’s not pronounced “ye-ar”

  18. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 7:36 pm

    I know. (I hate it when people pronounce Australia with four syllables.)

  19. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 7:39 pm

    “micro surplus”, “surplus envy”

    Slurp!

  20. May 10, 2012 7:41 pm

    “micro surplus”

    Nice touch…

  21. James of North Melbourne permalink
    May 10, 2012 7:41 pm

    They’re playing paint ball on The Block.

  22. TB Queensland permalink
    May 10, 2012 7:43 pm

    Julie Bishop looks like she’s walked off the set of Star Trek.

    I do wish you wouldn’t insult Star Trek like that …

    I know. (I hate it when people pronounce Australia with four syllables.)

    Ostraya grrrrrrrrr …

    I’ll stick around a bit but we’ve got some family “dramas” expecting a call from one of the kids …

    How are you watching this BTW ..

  23. May 10, 2012 7:45 pm

    why does Abbott keep referring to the “messiah” (Howard)?

  24. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 7:45 pm

    Jenny Macklin looks like she’s been into the sherry cabinet.

  25. May 10, 2012 7:50 pm

    I have a bottle of Coonawarra Cab Sav at the ready…

    May I inquire as to the vintage?

  26. TB Queensland permalink
    May 10, 2012 7:50 pm

    OK found bigpond live …

    Twiggy got a mention!

  27. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 7:51 pm

    It’s on ABC1 TB.

  28. TB Queensland permalink
    May 10, 2012 7:51 pm

    I’m getting sleepy already!

  29. TB Queensland permalink
    May 10, 2012 7:52 pm

    Socialism masquerading as environmentalism – so?

  30. TB Queensland permalink
    May 10, 2012 7:53 pm

    Agree Asian languages need a boost!

  31. TB Queensland permalink
    May 10, 2012 7:53 pm

    Wht does “a rational way” mean?

  32. May 10, 2012 7:54 pm

    “May I inquire as to the vintage?”

    2008. It’s satisfactory, but not up to usual standards I readily confess.

  33. TB Queensland permalink
    May 10, 2012 7:54 pm

    Within a fkn decade!

  34. TB Queensland permalink
    May 10, 2012 7:55 pm

    Phone call … enjoy … catch youse all tomorrow!

  35. May 10, 2012 7:55 pm

    Turn around “illegal” boats…?

    What is an “illegal” boat…?

  36. May 10, 2012 7:57 pm

    Bit young. May need decantering before I accept your kind invitation to a glass.

  37. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 7:57 pm

    An underage punt?

  38. May 10, 2012 7:58 pm

    It’s a pretty impressive speech from Tony…

    It targets every weakness of the government.

    Whoever prepared it should be congratulated.

  39. May 10, 2012 8:01 pm

    Migs, perhaps I could interest you in a cigar and a grandfather’s port…?

  40. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:01 pm

    Julia and Wayne were very restrained. I suppose they knew a prime time audience wouldn’t like the usual “interjections”.

  41. May 10, 2012 8:07 pm

    Julia looked like she had been slapped around the face with a wet fish…

    Clearly she didn’t like Abbott airing all the dirty accusations about Thomson, Slipper and the betrayal of Wilkie in such a candid fashion.

  42. May 10, 2012 8:09 pm

    Noone should trust a thing that Abbott said.

    He doesn’t do honesty.

  43. May 10, 2012 8:10 pm

    Cigar and coffee, then off to bed.

    Some public servants work hard, you know. 😯

  44. May 10, 2012 8:13 pm

    I didn’t watch, which leads me to wonder…what the fuck has “Thomson, Slipper and the betrayal of Wilkie” got to do with a budget reply?

    Abbott is a one trick pony. 🙄

  45. May 10, 2012 8:13 pm

    “He doesn’t do honesty.”

    Salient point Boss, but I suspect many people will be swayed with what was a very polished performance and went for the jugular on a lot of Labor’s weaknesses.

    I reckon he’ll see a bounce after this…

    And regardless of which side of politics you sit on, at least he came across as “a human being” something that Julia is increasingly incapable of doing…

  46. May 10, 2012 8:15 pm

    Did he truly mention Howard? 😯

    Has he suddenly become a plus for them again? He left in disgrace & hubris.

  47. May 10, 2012 8:16 pm

    “Some public servants work hard, you know.”

    Poor thing. Early 9.00am start tomorrow…?

  48. May 10, 2012 8:16 pm

    . . . he came across as “a human being”

    You’ve been eating dope cookies, haven’t you?

    BTW, what does he come across as at other times?

  49. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:18 pm

    Foreign languages aren’t as important as they perhaps once were. English is the language of the internet, and is taught in most countries. Learning one of the Asian languages when most Asians are learning yours doesn’t seem all that smart.

  50. May 10, 2012 8:20 pm

    “what does he come across as at other times?”

    A reanimated corpse; a younger version of Philip Ruddock…

  51. el gordo permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:21 pm

    The abbott has spent a few years reinventing himself and the people like what they see.

    ‘He doesn’t do honesty.’

    Practising catlicks don’t lie on purpose, do you have a link to a lie?

  52. May 10, 2012 8:23 pm

    Not so sure about that Tony…

    Chinese and Japanese people (especially in business) are very impressed if you make the effort to talk to them in their native tongue..

    It’s a sign of respect, rather than “expecting” that they should simply “speak English”.

  53. el gordo permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:25 pm

    oh…wait…I just googled ‘abbott lies’ and came across 9000 hits.

    Pur speculation.

  54. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:26 pm

    I could be wrong, reb. That’s just my gut feeling.

  55. James of North Melbourne permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:28 pm


    Did he truly mention Howard?
    Has he suddenly become a plus for them again? He left in disgrace & hubris.

    politics is largely a relative game.

  56. May 10, 2012 8:33 pm

    “Practising catlicks don’t lie on purpose”

    What crap.

    “the people like what they see.”

    What utter crap.

  57. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:33 pm

    Doesn’t matter if Howard was a lying rodent, or the worst person in the world. If Abbott can make this about the Howard government‘s economic record vs. that of the Rudd/Gillard government, he’s on fertile ground.

  58. May 10, 2012 8:34 pm

    People hate Gillard, that doesn’t mean they love Abbott…on the contrary, he isn’t popular.

  59. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:34 pm

    Good comebacks joffrey. 😉

  60. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:35 pm

    People don’t like Abbott, they just dislike him a lot less than they dislike Ms Gillard.

  61. May 10, 2012 8:36 pm

    “If Abbott can make this about the Howard government‘s economic record vs. that of the Rudd/Gillard government, he’s on fertile ground.”

    Or, if Abbott can make his budget reply about “Thomson, Slipper and the betrayal of Wilkie”, rather than fleshing out his alternative (beyond meaningless catch phrases)…then he’s avoided necessary scrutiny once again.

  62. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:38 pm

    “then he’s avoided necessary scrutiny once again.”

    Which means he’s keeping the focus on a floundering government, and off himself. Smart politics wouldn’t you say?

  63. May 10, 2012 8:39 pm

    “People don’t like Abbott, they just dislike him a lot less than they dislike Ms Gillard.”

    I agree.

    That’s quite different to stating that “the people like what they see” in Abbott.

  64. Tom of Melbourne permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:40 pm

    I’m just in from a quick meal, and a (shared) bottle of a Heathcote shiraz.

    Abbott would only have to say “my name is Tony Abbott” to register a higher ranking on the honesty scale that the “unReal Julia”

  65. May 10, 2012 8:40 pm

    Smart politics, yes, but not an endorsement of the man’s character or an indication of his ultimate intentions if he were to win government.

  66. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:41 pm

    ‘That’s quite different to stating that “the people like what they see” in Abbott’

    Yes. Who even said that? 😯

  67. May 10, 2012 8:42 pm

    True boss.

    People hate them both (Gillard and Abbott)…

  68. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:43 pm

    ‘Smart politics, yes, but not an endorsement of the man’s character or an indication of his ultimate intentions if he were to win government.’

    Agreed, and that’s just the way he wants it, I suspect.

  69. May 10, 2012 8:44 pm

    “Who even said that? ”

    el gordo permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:21 pm

    The abbott has spent a few years reinventing himself and the people like what they see.

  70. James of North Melbourne permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:44 pm

    I do think though that there’s a slow grudging increase in Tony Abbotts popularity. Probably mostly as a result of the incessant sneering from the Government. They have way overplayed the Abbott unpopularity card. People are beginning to like him just because Gillard doesn’t want them to.

  71. May 10, 2012 8:44 pm

    “a (shared) bottle of a Heathcote shiraz”

    So you’re still semi-sober then… What a refreshing change.

  72. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:46 pm

    The government’s desperate to get Abbott to outline his policies so they can pick them apart. Abbott’s not falling for that, and, because the public’s no longer listening to the government, he doesn’t have to.

  73. May 10, 2012 8:47 pm

    “People are beginning to like him just because Gillard doesn’t want them to.”

    Nah, I think that people are beginning to like him because they have short memories and that he’s not Julia Gillard.

  74. Tom of Melbourne permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:47 pm

    I don’t think people like what they see in Abbott, I think they see a relatively dull suburban husband who is not terribly talented, original, thoughtful or compassionate.

    He’s popular by default, because Gillard has given the ALP the worst reputation of a political party in my memory.

    She’s a disaster, whereas Abbott is only mildly offensive.

  75. Tom of Melbourne permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:49 pm

    Still semi sboer! and I’m not opneing anohter one!

  76. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:49 pm

    ‘They have way overplayed the Abbott unpopularity card.’

    Just like everything else they touch. It’s like their top advisor is a Liberal plant who’s advising them to do the exact opposite of what they should be doing.

  77. May 10, 2012 8:50 pm

    Abbott will dispose of Gillard, yes…but noone is too concerned about what happens after that.

    I contend that he’s a one trick pony. A focal point for discontent & reflexive opposition…but not a leader or a man of integrity.

  78. May 10, 2012 8:53 pm

    “I do think though that there’s a slow grudging increase in Tony Abbotts popularity. ”

    What crap.

    “People are beginning to like him just because Gillard doesn’t want them to.”

    (most) People aren’t that thick.

  79. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 8:53 pm

    Abbott is far from my ideal candidate (there isn’t one, currently) but, after the debacle we’ve just been through, he’ll be mildly refreshing.

  80. May 10, 2012 8:56 pm

    I think “anyone but Gillard” would sum up how I’m feeling…

  81. May 10, 2012 8:56 pm

    “He’s popular by default, because Gillard has given the ALP the worst reputation of a political party in my memory.”

    No. He’s the alternative by default. He’s not popular.

  82. May 10, 2012 9:00 pm

    I think that the loathing of the ALP is self perpetuating, but they’re nowhere near as bad as they’re made out to be.
    I have no doubt that Abbott would prove to be a sack of shit.

    So, I can’t agree with “anyone but Gillard”. I’m more inclined to see it as “be careful what you wish for”.

    That the ALP will be shown the door is an inevitability & a healthy development. What comes next is concerning, particularly if the pendulum swings backwards into the 1950’s too far due to an absolute rout (which appears likely).

  83. May 10, 2012 9:02 pm

    Obama endorsed gay marriage today, btw.

    A brave move in the sewer of US politics.

    Admirable, but perhaps asking a lot of the tolerance of dumbass yokels.

  84. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 9:10 pm

    “Obama may be the only person in America who supported gay marriage in 1996 but opposed it in 2011.”

    http://www.buzzfeed.com/andrewkaczynski/an-obama-gay-marriage-timeline

  85. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 9:13 pm

    ‘but they’re nowhere near as bad as they’re made out to be.’

    That’s where you’re wrong. They are the worst Australian federal government in living memory, if not in recorded history.

  86. el gordo permalink
    May 10, 2012 9:14 pm

    ‘He’s not popular.’

    It doesn’t matter, the people are not thick, it’s all about policy and even a blind dog could lead the Coalition to victory.

  87. May 10, 2012 9:15 pm

    I’d suggest that that is a relative judgement.

  88. May 10, 2012 9:15 pm

    In response to Tosy.

  89. May 10, 2012 9:21 pm

    Even a blind dog could lead the Coalition to victory. I wholeheartedly concur.

    But. It’s got naught to do with Coalition policy because that’s something which has been kept deliberately intangible, as per Tosy’s observation above.

    I also think that Abbott will absolutely disappoint many of you with regard to his stance on AGW. He’s a political coward who plays to poulism. Far too cynical & manipulative to come out & boldly state that AGW is bullshit, whether he thinks it or not (I imagine he does, he’s Pell’s suppository after all).

  90. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 9:25 pm

    My judgement of this government is subjective, of course. It’s a”vibe” thing. 😉

    But in my “living” “memory”, there has never been a more disfunctional, dishonest, divisive, spiteful, acrimonious, self-serving bunch of incompetent lightweights with illusions of grandeur to “grace” the government benches than this rabble. Full Stop.

  91. Neil of Sydney permalink
    May 10, 2012 9:26 pm

    Great line from Abbott

    “Even if the Treasurer is right, it will take 100 years of Swan surpluses to repay just four years of Swan deficits.”

  92. May 10, 2012 9:27 pm

    Given that he’s campaigning for another term, I think today’s stance on gay marriage, by Obama, is brave & poses an interesting wedge.

    Whether it’s foolhardy or not remains to be seen. I harbour some doubt as to the readiness of a majority of Americans (a notoriously, irrationally religious lot, dripping with biblical vagaries) to accomodate such a position. I think it is a push button issue which will influence many to vote negatively.

  93. Tom of Melbourne permalink
    May 10, 2012 9:29 pm

    Tony seems to have left out “malicious” & “fraudulent”.

  94. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 9:29 pm

    delusions of grandeur?

    ‘Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.’ (Orwell’s Rules)

  95. May 10, 2012 9:30 pm

    I remember the Howard government for much the same rationale, Tony. 😉

    One thing the ALP hasn’t done (yet) is march us into dubious foreign military conflictss. Sure, they’ve maintained them, but they had little choice. The duplicity of Howard, with regard to Iraq in particular, in making a case for war, was contemptible.

  96. May 10, 2012 9:32 pm

    I break Orwell’s rules all of the time. Why should I listen to a socialist? 😆

  97. May 10, 2012 9:33 pm

    Malicious is a good word to use in conjunction with “Tony Abbott”.

  98. James of North Melbourne permalink
    May 10, 2012 9:37 pm

    I really don’t get the loathing directed towards Abbott. Initially I thought he was your basic dickhead but I’ve warmed to him over the period. His willingness to oppose the CC stuff helped, but over time as you learn more about the bloke, and listen to what he says (as opposed to the words and contexts attributed to him) maybe he’s actually quite a decent fella. He gets bagged for his swimwear but he’s a surf lifesaver. He gets bagged for his conservative social positions yet he spends a couple of weeks a year living with and teaching Aboriginals. He’s a misogynist yet he has a beautiful family made up of women. And the half dozen people that I know that know him (Sancty’s Mates) just reckon he’s a good bloke.

    He’s not faultless by any stretch, but neither is he deserving of the pure hatred thrown his way, which leads me to wonder whether it’s more about the threat he represents to Labor than anything else.

  99. May 10, 2012 9:45 pm

    I could care less about threats to Labor, snacty.

    He’s a prick, he conducts himself like a cynical prick & he pulls the wool over the eyes of those who’d rather see him as something else.

    For me, it’s his airs & fancies & conservative social positions which get stuck in my craw. I have no issue with somebody having conservative social positions, but I have no confidence that they don’t influence Abbott to impose them upon others.

    I’d hardly describe myself or my commenting as ALP affiliated.

    Abbott’s been around for a long time. I’ve had many years to observe him & draw my conclusions. If & when he gets into power, he’ll tarnish his own shine in the eyes of all but his most ardent supporters simply by being the arrogant shitbird that he is. He seems unable to control his temper, something which I abhor in people, but particularly in those who are authority figures.

  100. Tom of Melbourne permalink
    May 10, 2012 9:47 pm

    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/swan-family-feud-over-pokie-reforms/story-e6freuzr-1226157587627

    Now I don’t wish to be impolite, but I’d like to see some photos of Wayne actually surfing. I’ve seen a few of Abbott on his feet, struggling on a mini mal on a shore break FFS.

    But how about some of Wayne dropping in on a grommet for example.

  101. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 9:47 pm

    Whatever Orwell’s nominal political philosophy, his disdain for nanny statism big brotherism totalitarianism tells me he was pro-freedom, which is good enough for me. (Pro-freedom is pretty much the opposite to how socialism actually worked out, too.)

  102. May 10, 2012 9:49 pm

    Also, he is aligned with many a rightwing cockhead de jour. Not a great selling point for someone like me. 😉

    He is perfect for the conservative base…but at least half the population doesn’t warm to rightwing cockheadism.

    Believing in magical sky wizards is just another nail in his coffin of empty credibility. 😯

  103. el gordo permalink
    May 10, 2012 9:50 pm

    ‘I also think that Abbott will absolutely disappoint many of you with regard to his stance on AGW.’

    Not the Denialati, we have him in our pocket.

  104. May 10, 2012 9:52 pm

    Chicks don’t surf?

  105. May 10, 2012 9:54 pm

    “we have him in our pocket.”

    Nah, I reckon y’all have that backwards.

    Abbott has you in his pocket.

  106. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 9:54 pm

    😯

  107. May 10, 2012 9:55 pm

    I like Orwell, btw, and appreciate his insights.

    I was being facetious. 😉

  108. James of North Melbourne permalink
    May 10, 2012 10:00 pm

    Right. So you hate social conservatives who believe in god.

  109. Tom of Melbourne permalink
    May 10, 2012 10:01 pm

    ” Chicks don’t surf?

    Wayne says he is a keen surfer, which really should provide so many photo opportunities. It should make him as popular as Abbott for the photographers.

    All surfers look clumsy in the water about every 15 minutes, no matter how good they are.

    (Like your HD, I have a daughter who is a very keen surfer)

  110. May 10, 2012 10:05 pm

    Hate isn’t the right word.

    And, not all of them.

    But yeah, I think they’re full of shit.

    It may surprise you to learn that I work & interact harmoniously with hordes of them every day. I have many friends with such views…but I wouldn’t want them running the country; that’s the difference.
    I could care less about an individuals ideology until they inflict it upon me or mine. Outside of that, I find plenty of common ground & friendship with almost every person who I’ve ever spent time with.

    I’m not a bigot.

  111. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 10:07 pm

    Okay, so your pantzwetting that Teh Abbott is gonna try and convert you to some kinda North Shore Kreationizm?

  112. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 10:09 pm

    😯 😉

  113. James of North Melbourne permalink
    May 10, 2012 10:14 pm

    It comes as no surprise to me at all, Toilet, which is why the vehemence of your expressed views on Abbott do.

  114. May 10, 2012 10:23 pm

    Same goes for the hyperbole concerning Gillard, guys. 😉

    Gotta go, last N/S prior to 10 days off. It’s been nice chatting. 🙂

  115. JAWS permalink
    May 10, 2012 10:23 pm

    So JAWS shows up and all you wimps are in bed

  116. el gordo permalink
    May 10, 2012 10:26 pm

    ‘Abbott has you in his pocket.’

    Nobody cheers for him, he is the anti hero and as such is forced to do the people’s bidding. Abbott is in our pocket.

    The man has a philosophical bent and is reasonably intelligent, he will fight the election on Coalition policy and streak home by a country mile.

    In particular, the architects of the green revolution will be decimated, because that is what a large proportion of the Australian population want.

  117. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 10:28 pm

    See ya Joffrey.

    Now Jaws arrives. 🙄

  118. JAWS permalink
    May 10, 2012 10:33 pm

    On the radio home tonight Abbott was getting a lot of positive
    comments from journos .

    Gillards media advisor is a scot / Pom or whatever. Did he decide on the class
    warfare thingo ? Because it’s not cutting it in Sydney. People are furious about
    that shit

  119. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 10:37 pm

    ‘Did he decide on the class warfare thingo ? Because it’s not cutting it in Sydney. People are furious about that shit’

    They live in an echo chamber. They actually believe their own bullshit.

  120. JAWS permalink
    May 10, 2012 10:51 pm

    Ain’t that the truth ToSY.

    Just catching up with the speech now.
    Seems pretty good. Gillard stiff faced.

  121. Tony permalink
    May 10, 2012 11:20 pm

    A “tribute” to the Soviet GULAG system, which ended just 20 years ago. . .

  122. JAWS permalink
    May 10, 2012 11:46 pm

    Why is the murderdoch partially controlled
    sky news continually broadcasting the
    uk leveson enquiry ?

    Don’t they answer frantic phone
    calls from a penthouse in
    New York ?

  123. armchair opinionator permalink
    May 11, 2012 12:53 am

    Did he decide on the class warfare thingo ? Because it’s not cutting it in Sydney. People are furious about that shit…

    That would be the entitlement syndrome again, the people that are getting all the taxpayer benefits now are furious about having some of it taken away.

    I was at work and missed the show, the earnest angryman face, the vehement ferocity, the arm pumping of pompous histrionics and hyperbole that is tony abbott esquire. Did he actually address the budget and give an alternative?

    I reckon he was there on false pretences, no policy should mean no right of reply! Light on substance, heavy on steaming pile of excrement, one day he’s going to be consumed by his own manure.

  124. Neil of Sydney permalink
    May 11, 2012 6:38 am

    Wow, Miglo will not be happy. This from Abbotts speech

    “We’ll cut business red tape costs by at least a billion dollars a year by requiring each government agency to quantify the costs of its reporting and compliance rules and delivering an annual savings target.

    Public service bonuses won’t be paid unless these targets are met. ”

    Why should people get bonuses anyway for doing their job?? I have never received a bonus in my job. In fact no-one gets them where I work.

  125. el gordo permalink
    May 11, 2012 7:30 am

    ‘Did he actually address the budget and give an alternative?’

    I missed the reply, but later heard Wong say much the same as you. The difficulty is that without a mining tax and CO2 tax the sums were hard to work out.

    A masterly effort in presenting a philosophical view, something the people understand.

  126. JAWS permalink
    May 11, 2012 8:51 am

    I had to laugh at Penny Wong’s press conference. She was prattling on about how Mr Abbott was soooooooooooooo negative.

    Mr Abbott said ………………“No” to “Motherhood”,

    Mr Abbott said……………… “No” to “Seeing Eye Dogs”

    Mr Abbott said……………… “No” to “Hungry Puppies”

    …………………blah blah blah.

    But she completely left out a major part of his speech.

    She neglected to mention that

    Mr Abbott said……………… “No to the Carbon Tax”

    Cant think of how she missed that one

    LOL

  127. JAWS permalink
    May 11, 2012 11:20 am

    This guy was also pretty light on detail in his Budget Reply

    ****2007 Budget Reply speech by the Leader of the Opposition, Kevin Rudd****

    Mr Speaker, I am an optimist when it comes to our country’s future. Tonight I want to outline our plan for our country’s future.

    I believe budgets should not be about the next election. They should be about the next decade. They should reflect the ambition we have for our nation’s long-term future.

    Mr Speaker, we are truly blessed to be Australians. We live in a stable democracy, when many in the world do not. We have enjoyed great prosperity – and have benefited from a time of unparalleled world economic growth.

    And to cap this off, we have prospered from the rise of China, the rise of India and the global resources boom.

    The benefits of this are washing through the economy, creating jobs, generating new businesses and boosting government revenues to an all time high.

    Mr Speaker, there is nothing to hold us back as a nation and as a people – except a lack of long-term vision. We are part of a world that is changing faster than ever before.

    In 2004 the world pumped out a staggering 26.6 billion tonnes of CO2 equivalent emissions into our atmosphere just from fuel combustion alone. China graduated half a million scientists and engineers. India graduated more PhDs than we can imagine. Italy will soon be laying out a broadband network for two-thirds of its population of up to 100 megabits per second.

    Big changes are coming. Big challenges are waiting around the corner. They will dramatically influence almost every aspect of our lives – some for the better, others for the worse. And some will be upon us in the blink of an eye.

    Mr Speaker, how we respond to these future challenges will define the security and prosperity of our nation for generations to come. The same for our communities. The same for our families.

    We can either wait for these challenges to swamp us and be left behind. Or we can anticipate them and act now while there is still time. We can either seize the great opportunities that have been presented to us. Or we can squander them.

    Or as a great American President once said “the time to fix the roof is when the sun is shining”. The truth is the sun is shining right now on Australia. We must seize the day and get our house in order. I believe Australia faces three core challenges to secure its future:

    • First, to build long-term economic prosperity, beyond the mining boom, by rebuilding productivity growth.

    • Second, to deal with, rather than avoid, the great challenge of climate change and water before the cost of inaction becomes far too great.

    • Third, to make sure the fair go in Australia has a future, not just a past – both within the workplace and outside the workplace as well.

    And beyond these three great challenges is the underlying challenge of remaining vigilant on our national security in an increasingly uncertain and threatening world.

    Which is why Budgets need to be about the next decade, not simply the next election.

    ECONOMIC FUNDAMENTALS

    Mr Speaker, the foundations upon which our long-term economic stability is built is a conservative fiscal policy and the independence of the Reserve Bank.

    If elected, the government I will lead will be grounded in the discipline of not spending more than we earn. We will maintain a budget surplus on average over the economic cycle. We will also not increase taxation as a proportion of gross domestic product.

    That’s why Labor has already identified $3 billion in savings over the forward estimates to help fund our future priorities. Tonight’s announcements are costed and funded.

    If elected, the government I lead will maintain the absolute independence of the Reserve Bank and the Bank’s inflation target.

    Both these disciplines are fundamental to keeping interest rates low. On this, there is a bipartisan consensus – as noted recently by the former Reserve Bank Governor Ian Macfarlane.

    Equally we must remain committed to keeping taxes low. It’s important for working families hit hard by the cost of mortgage repayments, food prices, petrol, education and childcare.

    It’s also crucially important for our businesses competing on the world stage.

    The Productivity Challenge

    Mr Speaker, where the paths of our two parties veer in opposite directions is on the core economic challenge of how to build long-term prosperity for Australia, once the mining boom is over.

    Productivity is the measure of how efficiently we produce goods and services. The better trained we are, the greater our productivity.

    · The better our use of technology in the workplace, the greater our productivity.

    · The better our management in the workplace, the greater our productivity.

    Productivity is a bit like getting the best performance out of your engine for the least amount of fuel.

    And productivity growth is the only reliable way to bring about long-term economic growth, more jobs and higher living standards without unleashing inflation.

    Australia’s recent record on productivity growth has been very poor indeed. Productivity growth was averaging 3.2 per cent in the mid-1990s before falling to 2.2 per cent at the turn of the decade. Last month the Government downgraded its estimate for the current decade to just 1.5 percent.

    In fact, this year’s budget papers contain the staggering admission that productivity growth is likely to be zero. This is a sure fire recipe for slowing down economic growth for Australia – even before the ageing of the Australian population sets in.

    In Australia today, this failure to improve productivity growth has been masked by the mining boom over the last four years.

    Right now the economy is cruising along with a very strong tailwind called the mining boom. But sometimes the wind changes direction and there can be lots of turbulence. And the only way to get home is with powerful engines that can do the hard yards in any conditions.

    The mining boom, driven entirely by factors beyond Australia’s control, has pumped hundreds of billions of dollars into our national economy.

    And as older Australians who’ve been around for a while will tell you – mining booms don’t last forever. The time for action is now. That’s why Labor calls now for an Education Revolution – before we lose one more day.

    Education Revolution

    Every country in the world knows the more you invest in the education, skills and training of your people, the more productive your economy becomes. The problem we have in Australia is that against so many of our competitor economies, we are falling behind.

    It is time to put a stop to this by investing in a real Education Revolution – not just increasing investment but also raising the standards. For Labor, we actually believe in education. It’s not something we’ve cooked up over night. It’s one of our core values – and has been so for more than a century.

    So what have we done about it? Since the beginning of the year we have released six chapters of our Education Revolution including:

    • early childhood education

    • literacy and numeracy

    • boosting the teaching and studying of maths and science in schools and universities by offering a significant reduction in HECS

    • establishing a national curriculum board to develop a uniform national curriculum for the core subjects of English, history, maths and science

    • and a program to foster the building and sharing of new first class facilities between schools, be they government or non-government.

    I am particularly proud of our $450 million policy on early childhood education providing pre-literacy and pre-numeracy play-based learning for all four year olds for 15 hours a week, 40 weeks a year, with a fully trained teacher.

    The earlier you invest in a child’s educational opportunities, the better the result. Good for the child. Good for the country.

    But while we offer this plan for the future, at present Australia ranks last out of the 32 richest economies in the world on the amount our national government invests in early childhood education.

    If we are serious about facing the future, this must change – and it must change now.

    Trades Training Centres in Schools

    Tonight I want to announce a further chapter in Labor’s Education Revolution. Mr Speaker, Labor sees no difference in value between a trade certificate and a university degree.

    I understand that not every young person wants to go to university. If elected to government, we will implement one of the biggest reforms in vocational education and training in Australian schools in history.

    It’s time to help bring trade training in schools into the 21st Century.

    A Labor Government will implement a $2.5 billion Trades in Schools program over ten years to build new Trades Training Centres and upgrade existing facilities and equipment in all of Australia’s 2650 secondary schools – both government and non government.

    This will mean an investment of $729 million spread over the four years to 2010-11. Each secondary school in Australia will be eligible for capital funding of between $500 thousand up to $1.5 million to build trade workshops, computer laboratories and other facilities to expand vocational education and training opportunities.

    Schools can apply to build metal workshops, commercial kitchens, automotive workshops, plumbing workshops, graphic design labs as well as ICT laboratories. And they can purchase equipment including drills, grinders, wood and metal turning lathes, ovens, soldering and welding equipment and computers.

    The extra recurrent costs for running the new Trade Training Centres will be negotiated between the Commonwealth and the states.

    Labor will also provide $84 million over four years to ensure access to on-the-job training for 20 weeks per year for year nine to 12 vocational education and trades students.

    This is part of a new national objective I am announcing tonight to lift year-12 retention rates from 75 percent to 85 percent by 2015 and to 90 percent by 2020.

    There are two main reasons why we need to do this as a nation. First, we have a skills shortage, and skills have become a core economic challenge for the nation. This is particularly the case in the traditional trades. Anyone trying to build or renovate a home right now will know exactly what I am talking about.

    But the tragedy is that there are so many young people of school age – or immediate post school age – who would be ideally suited to a career in the trades, who have simply dropped out all together.

    This is the second core reason underpinning our Trades in Schools program – it’s not only good for the economy, it’s good for young Australians as well. In 2006, 540,000 young Australians aged 16-24 were not engaged in either full time learning or work.

    Access Economics has estimated that if Australia raised its year 12 completion rates to 90 per cent from the 75 per cent it is today, we would add around $9 billion to our economy by the year 2040.

    I am very proud of this new chapter of Labor’s Education Revolution. It’s our core business. On Tuesday night the Government stated that it would establish three new Australian Technical Colleges across the whole country.

    Mr Speaker, if elected to government, we will make every secondary school that chooses, into a first-class provider of technical education.

    High speed broadband

    Labor’s Education Revolution is reinforced by our plan to invest up to $4.7 billion in partnership with the private sector to build a high speed National Broadband Network.

    If you have the best trained people in the world matched with the most modern information technology in the world, you can turbo charge overall productivity growth.

    In the 19th century, governments laid out railway networks as the arteries of the economy. In the 21st century, governments around the world are ensuring that high speed broadband networks are laid out – as the arteries of the new economy.

    Except in Australia, where we have one of the slowest broadband networks in the western world. And for those who don’t think that this is of real concern to the Australian small business community, they need to start listening.

    Labor’s plan is for a state-of-the-art fibre optic to the node national network with a speed of 12 megabits per second (capable of upscaling) to be laid out over a five year period. This is the nation building that the nation needs.

    BUSINESS REGULATION

    Achieving productivity growth is not just about bold visions. It also requires prudent management – in particular the streamlining of regulatory arrangements to unleash the full potential of our businesses.

    The Government has already conducted two enquiries – the Bell Inquiry followed by the Banks inquiry – with little effect. So-called regulatory impact statements are widely ignored.

    And the result is that business can’t get on with what they do best – spending most of their time developing new products, services and markets – as opposed to acting as compliance agents for national and state governments.

    I have already announced our intention in government of adopting a simple principle: no new regulation imposed on business unless an existing regulation is withdrawn.

    Tonight, I also want to outline a further set of measures to help get government off the back of business and free them up to create more jobs and more wealth for the future.

    Faster Commonwealth bill paying

    First, Labor will give small business the right to charge Commonwealth departments and agencies interest on bills not paid within thirty days. Late payments are a big problem for small business because of their significant impact on cash flow.

    Small businesses often waste time badgering government for payment, taking them away from their business. That will now change.

    A Superannuation Clearing House

    Second, Labor will establish an optional Superannuation Clearing House for all businesses that want to use it. Currently under choice of superannuation legislation, businesses are required to make payments into numerous superannuation funds.

    This has imposed yet more form filling and checking, cost and legal liability on business. Under Labor’s policy, businesses would simply make payments into one central clearing house at which point their legal responsibility is discharged.

    A standard disclosure form for financial services products

    And third, Labor will introduce a simple, standard disclosure form for financial services products.

    The government’s new financial disclosure regime has resulted in consumers physically being issued with long and complex documents of up to 100 pages long. It has created an administrative nightmare for businesses and consumers. Labor’s standard disclosure form will be no more than 3-4 pages in length, containing core information.

    Financial services providers would be required to have any further disclosure information on their websites.

    International competitiveness

    Mr Speaker, a core reason for rebuilding productivity growth is to ensure that our businesses are internationally competitive. For business it is a tough and highly competitive world out there.

    Beyond the resources sector, the Budget Papers demonstrate that our export performance in the years ahead will be poor. Once again, we can’t simply allow ourselves to ride on the back of the resources boom, just as previous governments back in the fifties and sixties chose to ride on the sheep’s back.

    This is short-sighted in the extreme. We have to be clear sighted about where Australia’s international competitive advantage lies for the future.

    One such opportunity lies with the Australian financial services industry and with the funds management industry in particular. Since the superannuation guarantee was introduced by the previous Labor Government in 1992, funds under management have grown from $250 billion to $1 trillion.

    Australia has one of the largest and most professional funds management industries in the world. But how can we turn our significant domestic funds management industry into a new export industry, given the growth in retirement incomes across East Asia?

    One of the concerns the industry faces is international tax competitiveness given the 30 percent withholding tax, which currently applies on distributions from Australian managed funds, compared with other major centres.

    My objective is to turn Australia into a funds management hub for Asia, building on the existing strengths of our funds management industry. This would earn extra income from Australia which in turn generates jobs and grows our economy.

    So tonight I announce that Labor in government will halve the withholding tax on distributions from Australian managed funds to non-residents from 30 percent to 15 percent.

    According to our advice, this tax currently generates some $30 million – but in our view halving it will provide concrete assistance to Australian funds managers competing against tax regimes applying to their competitors in Dublin, Luxembourg, New York and Singapore.

    Our intention is to enable Australian businesses to take on the world and win.

    Enabling business to engage with Asia

    Mr Speaker, at the dawn of the Asia-Pacific century, Australia lies in a region that will generate most of this century’s economic growth. We therefore must ensure that we provide our businesses with every chance in the decades ahead to engage fully in the new business opportunities that lie ahead.

    My plan is to help foster a generation of Asia-literate Australians increasingly comfortable with the languages and cultures of our region. This will help with future export opportunities.

    Several years ago, the government discontinued funding for the National Asian Languages and Studies in Australian Schools Strategy. This was a cooperative program which operated with the States and Territories from 1996 to 2002, which by that time had enabled hundreds of thousands of Australian school children to start learning the major languages of our region.

    Tonight I announce that Labor will re-establish an Asian languages and studies strategy for Australian schools. This will cost $65 million dollars over four years and will be done in partnership with the states and territories.

    If we are going to enable our businesses to take on the best and the brightest in the region and the world we have got to make sure they have all the skills to do so.

    CLIMATE CHANGE AND WATER

    Mr Speaker, preparing for Australia’s long-term economic future also means acting on climate change and on the water crisis. Without a plan to tackle climate change there can be no long-term solution to the water crisis.

    The science is in. Climate change is a reality. It’s happening now. And it’s effecting our future supply of water. The core economic reality is that there is an economic cost to Australia if we fail to act on climate change.

    The second core reality is that the economic cost of not acting will be far greater than the cost of taking early and responsible action. For this reason, we have already released a ten-point plan on climate change, including:

    • ratifying the Kyoto Protocol

    • reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 60 percent by 2050

    • establishing a $500 million national clean coal fund

    • as well as boosting the use of renewable energy through enabling Australians to access low-interest loans to help install energy-efficient measures such as solar panels

    Because of climate change we also need to adjust by using water more wisely. Our proposed loan fund can also be used to purchase rainwater tanks and other water efficiency measures at home.

    We have sought to provide the Prime Minister with bipartisan support to build a national consensus around his Murray-Darling initiative. A truly national water plan must ensure water security for all Australians including those in our cities and towns.

    We all know our reservoirs are dangerously low. We can do this by improving water security for local communities. That’s why we’ve committed to funding the Gold Fields Superpipe for Bendigo and Ballarat, the Geelong Shell Refinery water recycling project and other major urban water projects.

    Across Australia we have about 175,000 kilometres of water mains. Leaks from these pipes remain a major impediment to future water security. According to the National Water Commission, in some towns up to 30 per cent of water is lost from leaky pipes and burst water mains. More than 155 thousand megalitres goes down the drain in our capital cities each year.

    Water is too valuable and too precious to waste.

    Tonight I announce that if elected, we will begin by establishing a modest national fund to start plugging the leaks in the water pipes of our towns and cities. In office, Labor will:

    · work with state and local governments to identify relevant projects and take action;

    · provide matching funds for practical projects that can achieve measurable water savings outcomes; and

    · allocate $250 million dollars over the forward estimates to commence this program.

    It is a modest, practical program – but one we believe represents an important foundation on which we can later build.

    The national government cannot simply sit on its hands and do nothing about the water crisis affecting so many of our towns and cities..

    THE FUTURE OF THE FAIR GO

    I said earlier that our nation faces three core challenges for our future:

    • building long-term prosperity beyond the mining boom

    • acting on climate change and water

    • and making sure the fair go has a future, not just a past.

    The Government’s industrial relations laws have gone too far. They know it. The Australian people know it. That’s why four months before an election, they have pretended to change them.

    If we are elected to form the next government of Australia, we intend to restore the balance – because we believe you can build long-term prosperity without throwing the fair go out the back door.

    We believe we can get the balance right between fairness and flexibility. The government believes that it’s either one or the other. And we intend to prove them wrong. We want to unite Australia, not see it divided.

    CONCLUSION

    Mr Speaker, I conclude my remarks where I began. I am a great optimist when it comes to our country’s future. I did not come into this place tonight to outspend the Prime Minister and I have not.

    Instead I came here to offer an alternative plan for Australia’s future. I believe if as a nation we rise to the great challenges I have outlined tonight, we can build a better and more secure future for our families and for our country.

    Mr Speaker, so many Australians are depending on us to do so.

    · Our farmers battling the drought.

    · Pensioners and carers struggling to make ends meet – notwithstanding the one-off payments they have received.

    · Working families under financial pressure, for whom tax cuts are always welcome, together with childcare relief.

    All this, however, depends on building a strong economy into the future. All this depends on us now seizing the day on revolutionizing our approach to education.

    All this depends on us seizing the day on climate change and water. And all this, Mr Speaker, still depends on ensuring that in this great country of ours, the fair go has a future, and not just a past.

  128. armchair opinionator permalink
    May 11, 2012 11:36 am

    I had to laugh at Penny Wong’s press conference. She was prattling on about how Mr Abbott was soooooooooooooo negative.

    You didn’t notice the other headline news re costello and kroger? 😉 I think there’s a few people who will disappear from commenting for a day or two.

    Great line from Abbott

    Even greater lines from kroger. Poor neil, hope your love can survive these difficult times.

    BTW, I did note that when first questioned Abbott initially denied all – how does that work, only Julia tells lies eh? Now, it’s just a personal disagreement, heavens he gets a free pass from the press doesn’t he, deny and move on. If that was Labor, the ructions would be so loud we’d think there was an earthquake!

    I really don’t get the loathing directed towards Abbott….He’s not faultless by any stretch, but neither is he deserving of the pure hatred thrown his way…

    Some observations from the ‘other side’.

    Initially I thought he was your basic dickhead but I’ve warmed to him over the period. His willingness to oppose the CC stuff helped,

    But he hasn’t. He’s tried to walk both sides of the street. Tried to deny CC to some, then says the science is valid but we only need abbott’s army to fix it. What is his current position?

    He gets bagged for his swimwear but he’s a surf lifesaver.

    And no-one would care if he didn’t saturate all media with his self promotions in dicktogs and lycra. We got sick of seeing his groin thrust in our faces every day and wondered if he did any actual work.

    He gets bagged for his conservative social positions yet he spends a couple of weeks a year living with and teaching Aboriginals

    Good christian charity for aboriginals [as if that hasn’t caused aboriginals enough destruction already],. Abbott does some budgeting assistance in [doesn’t social security have that covered?] the nice sheltered workshop of noel pearson country. If abbott ventured into kalkaringi, ngukurr or barunga, I might have a little more respect for his ‘good works’ but I think he does it more for his CV.

    He’s a misogynist yet he has a beautiful family made up of women.

    I don’t know how wonderful the women are we haven’t heard much from them. Do you know them personally james? I can say that erin swan and rudd’s daughters seem nice as they have appeared in public, but don’t know anything about the abbott’s except the daughter who said her father is “a gay churchy loser”. Also, I would think that the credit for the daughters should go to margie abbott seeing tony is “everywhere but home,” if he spends his spare time on his own sporting/physical prowess and his breaks with the noel pearson aboriginals, how much time is devoted to home? “father knows best” is more his style. Perhaps abbott has a lot of spare time, guess you can if you are not busy with little things like policies, if all you do is traipse around factories in hi-vis pretending to do the jobs of blue collar workers..oh and craig, craig, craig.

    And because he has fathered girls, doesn’t mean he can’t be a misogynist [he is].

  129. TB Queensland permalink
    May 11, 2012 11:44 am

    Wally, are staying with Farnham Bear? Do you really think anyone would read that!

    This is a blog not a bloody newspaper quotation club …

    At least, KL’s, posts are “original work” … 🙂

  130. JAWS permalink
    May 11, 2012 12:00 pm

    Yes TB

    After I posted that I realised I had just hoisted a rather unwanted dust covered “Trophy” aloft. 🙂

    My apologies.

    But it just shows that “Replies” never have any detail and are really just political rather than economic agendas.

  131. armchair opinionator permalink
    May 11, 2012 12:20 pm

    I had to laugh at Penny Wong’s press conference. She was prattling on about how Mr Abbott was soooooooooooooo negative.

    Isn’t he? have I missed his visionary positivism somehow. All I’ve heard has been talking down the best economy in the world and doom and gloom, we’ll all be rooned as well as labor = bad, thomson = badder, julia is a lying witch and should be kicked to death or similar.

    yeah, that’s positive and refreshing, if that is him being positive, I’d hate to hear him being negative.

  132. JAWS permalink
    May 11, 2012 12:23 pm

    “All I’ve heard has been talking down the best economy in the world…………….”

    Oh really…………………the “best”

    Pity that’s not actually true

  133. el gordo permalink
    May 11, 2012 12:27 pm

    ‘Isn’t he? have I missed his visionary positivism somehow.’

    Yes…

  134. el gordo permalink
    May 11, 2012 12:37 pm

    ‘He reaffirmed his promise to order the abolition of the carbon tax the day after he was elected, saying that ”would be the swiftest contribution [a] government could make to relieving cost-of-living pressure”.

  135. TB Queensland permalink
    May 11, 2012 12:48 pm

    LOL! Would you like acrimony with that, Mr Custard?

    http://www.news.com.au/national/liberal-powerbroker-says-peter-costello-remains-obsessed-with-leadership/story-e6frfkvr-1226352860656

    “They’re not in it any more. They’re out. It’s just a joke.”

    LOL! Thay got tah right … Dodgy Brothers anyone … 😛

  136. James of North Melbourne permalink
    May 11, 2012 12:59 pm

    I think there’s a few people who will disappear from commenting for a day or two.

    Who specifically?

  137. TB Queensland permalink
    May 11, 2012 1:01 pm

    Pity that’s not actually true

    So edify us … (instead of leving hanging statements …) 🙄

  138. May 11, 2012 1:01 pm

    Public service bonuses won’t be paid unless these targets are met.

    Sounds fair to me, Neil.

    Funny thing, though, bonuses were sweeteners to lure staff onto an AWA. AWAs were scrapped when WorkChoices bit the dust.

    And who wants to re-introduce them?

  139. TB Queensland permalink
    May 11, 2012 1:03 pm

    Who specifically?

    LOL!

  140. May 11, 2012 1:10 pm

    I have never received a bonus in my job.

    Gosh. And I wonder why. 🙄

  141. May 11, 2012 1:18 pm

    That’s what I was thinking!!! LOL!

  142. Neil of Sydney permalink
    May 11, 2012 2:30 pm

    Very funny. They do not pay anyone a bonus where I work.

    By the way any idea how much money a PS gets if he gets a bonus??

  143. May 11, 2012 2:40 pm

    “They do not pay anyone a bonus where I work.”

    Are you 100% sure Neil? Maybe you’re just not aware of them…

    “Bonuses” can come in many different shapes and forms…

  144. Bacchus permalink
    May 11, 2012 3:05 pm

    Neil, As an example – from the Dept of Finance 2007-08 Annual Report:

    Ratings are provided to staff following their end of cycle performance assessment in May/June. Staff rated ‘highly effective’ or above receive performance bonuses. The maximum potential bonus for staff up to APS6 is five per cent of their annual salary. For EL staff, the maximum potential bonus is 7.5 per cent and for SES staff, it is ten per cent.

    http://www.finance.gov.au/publications/annual-reports/annualreport07-08/chapter_09/remuneration_rewards_and_recognition.html

  145. Neil of Sydney permalink
    May 11, 2012 6:07 pm

    Sounds like Labor was giving Public Servants bonuses whether they performed or not.

    Here is another cut Labor put in the budget.

    The threshold above which a taxpayer may claim net medical expenses tax offset will be increased to $5,000 and indexed annually thereafter. The reimbursement rate will be reduced to 10% for eligible out of pocket expenses.”

    They had already increased this threshold earlier from $2,000 to $3,000. Now they have increased it again.

  146. TB Queensland permalink
    May 11, 2012 6:09 pm

    They had already increased this threshold earlier from $2,000 to $3,000. Now they have increased it again.

    I suppose when your still at high school Mum and dad worry about med bills … hey, Noddy?

  147. May 11, 2012 6:18 pm

    Neil shuts his eyes & thinks of John Winston in his tracksuit while he plays pocket bingo.

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